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When considering a merger proposal, the Boundaries Commission or Delegate (depending on the Minister’s election is required to have regard to the following factors in section 263(3) of the Local Government Act 1993:

(a)  the financial advantages or disadvantages (including the economies or diseconomies of scale) of any relevant proposal to the residents and ratepayers of the areas concerned,

(b)  the community of interest and geographic cohesion in the existing areas and in any proposed new area,

(c)  the existing historical and traditional values in the existing areas and the impact of change on them,

(d)  the attitude of the residents and ratepayers of the areas concerned,

(e)  the requirements of the area concerned in relation to elected representation for residents and ratepayers at the local level, the desirable and appropriate relationship between elected representatives and ratepayers and residents and such other matters as it considers relevant in relation to the past and future patterns of elected representation for that area,

(e1)  the impact of any relevant proposal on the ability of the councils of the areas concerned to provide adequate, equitable and appropriate services and facilities,

(e2)  the impact of any relevant proposal on the employment of the staff by the councils of the areas concerned,

(e3)  the impact of any relevant proposal on rural communities in the areas concerned,

(e4)  in the case of a proposal for the amalgamation of two or more areas, the desirability (or otherwise) of dividing the resulting area or areas into wards,

(e5)  in the case of a proposal for the amalgamation of two or more areas, the need to ensure that the opinions of each of the diverse communities of the resulting area or areas are effectively represented,

(f)  such other factors as it considers relevant to the provision of efficient and effective local government in the existing and proposed new areas.

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